Cover photo for Charles "Chuck" Martinson's Obituary
Charles "Chuck" Martinson Profile Photo
1934 Charles "Chuck" 2014

Charles "Chuck" Martinson

July 27, 1934 — January 29, 2014

Charles "Chuck" Martinson, 79, of Barnesville, died on Wednesday, January 29, 2014 at the Vibra Hospital in Fargo with his family by his side. Funeral services will be 11:00 am, Monday, February 3, 2014 at Our Saviors Lutheran Church in Barnesville, MN with Rev. Colin Grangaard officiating. Burial will follow in City Cemetery, Barnesville, MN. Visitation will be 2-5 PM, Sunday, February, 2, 2014 at Dobmeier Funeral Home in Barnesville with a Prayer Service at 4:00 PM. Visitation will be held one hour prior to the funeral service at the church on Monday. Charles Robert Martinson was born on July 27, 1934 to Gilbert and Minnie (Skriden) in Rothsay, MN. He was baptized and confirmed in Hamar Lutheran Church in Rothsay. He attended school in Rothsay and graduated in 1951. He was united in marriage to Mary Anne Berglund on August 17, 1957 at Christine Lake Lutheran Church, near Evansville, MN. Chuck worked in the Grina Hardware Store in Rothsay. He later moved to Barnesville where he worked at the Grina-Olson Furniture Store and Funeral Home before Chuck took over the business and ran the Martinson Furniture Store until 1984. He later worked at Carpet World in Fargo for 20 years until he retired in 2006. Chuck was very active in many organizations that promoted the well-being of the Barnesville Community. He is survived by his wife Mary Anne Martinson, Barnesville, four children: David Martinson, Moorhead, MN, Gary Martinson, Minneapolis, MN, Kay (Bruce) Kramer, Missoula, MT, Brian (Jody) Martinson, Perham, MN, five grandchildren: Marisa Kramer, Joel Kramer, Carter Martinson, Jordan Martinson, Emily Martinson, foreign exchange son originally from Bolivia: Chalo (Monica) Flores, and their children Nicol, Micaela, Natalia, two sisters Clarice Grina, Fergus Falls, Marcella Nettestad, Fergus Falls, and many nieces and nephews, other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by one daughter Joan, his parents Gilbert and Minnie, brothers Chester, Oscar, sisters Hazel Kaine, Louella Bjorklund. In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to donors choice. Gary Martinson's Eulogy to his dad: Dad Opening Comments to include: Uff Da! Dad would be very proud and honored to be associated with this audience of Family, Friends and the Community. In Dads spirit he would also seize this opportunity to engage with this cast of characters that are represented here. Rest assured Dad has been very, very busy in his new transition to Norwegian Heaven. For example, He has already negotiated a better handicap with the Angels; been brought together with his Mom and Dad, brothers and sisters,his daughter Joannie is jumping into his arms again he is being reconnected with his buddies like Giggs Clark, Bud Shulstad, Vern Quinald, Huck and Carmen,to name a few. He most likely has found an entertaining round table just like when he often attended at the Eagle Cafe. Just think how many people he now has to visit with, tell stories, laugh with and to share with them his smile that spans from ear to ear. I would like to recognize his family members that meant so much to him, his sisters Clarice and Marcella, of course my Mom, my brother Dave and his son Carter; my sister Kay and her husband Bruce their children Marisa and Joel. My brother Brian and his wife Jody and their daughters Jordan and Emily. My foreign exchange student brother Chalo, his wife Monica, and their daughters Nicol, Micaela and Natalia. My gal Sandra, and all the cousins, nieces and nephews. You are all family and Dad loved family. There are also many people that could not attend this service, but wanted to be heard and one of them is My cousin Mike from Philadelphia. Mike sent me a letter and I feel his story is a good example of Dads life. It reads: Remembering Uncle Bobby My first memory of Uncle Bobby was when I was probably about 8 years old. Since we lived in Philadelphia, every two years we would trek to Minnesota for a two-week visit. There was always a big get-together on one of the Sundays we were there. The kids running around the Martinson farm playing ball or tag. The women in the kitchen - how stereotypical for the 1960s? - and the men would be playing cards in the dining room. During a break in the card game, Bobby came out to the living room where a bunch of the younger kids were watching TV. He had a deck of cards in his hand and walked directly to me. Probably because my cousins knew better, and they had most likely already been burned once or twice themselves, Bobby asked me if I wanted to play a card game with him? Me? A mere kid, playing cards with one of the adults? Sure! "Great," he said. "We'll play 52 Pickup." "OK," I said, not knowing this new game, but anxious to learn. As quickly as I agreed, the cards went flying into the air, falling all over the floor. I looked at Bobby with a puzzled look on my face. "What game is this?" I asked. "52 Pickup," Bobby replied with that grin of his that seemed to go from ear to ear. "Now, pick them up!" he chuckled, looking around the living room with knowing nods from cousins/victims before rejoining the "real" card game. The city boy had been out slicked by his country uncle. When Bobby was around, laughter would not be far behind. I have been accused of having a dry sense of humor, able to make a humorous delivery with a straight face. But, I was an amateur compared to Bobby. If my humor was dry, his was arid like the Sahara. If my face was straight, his was glacial like Mount Rushmore. He would string you along for as long he had to, or for as long as it delighted him and others who knew what he was up to. Even when you were the butt of his jokes you eventually joined in the laughter, although your face might be blushing a bit. And that's how I'll always remember Bobby, creating mild mischief and mirth, but always leaving you with a smile on your face. We should all hope to be remembered that way. Signed, Nephew Mike Kaine My Dad loved peopleto say he was a people person just might be an understatement. He thrived on the energy that people provided. He was influenced by others and certainly influenced many others. He was committed to his Family first, his Friends and his Community. Dads life was shaped by 5 Pillars, which many of you are familiar with: 1. Born in Rothsay, did you all know he was from Rothsay? Growing up on the humble family farm in Rothsay, Dad learned the true meaning of family and traditions. During a recent visit at the hospital a Nurse came to provide Dad with a bath and it made me remember when Dad told me about his baths that he and his sisters and brothers would take on Saturdays. In the summer, that meant outdoors with one tub and one batch of warm water. Dad was first as he was the youngest and it went up through the line Marcella, then Louella, Chester, Oscar, Hazel and then Clarice sorry Clarice as you got all the dirty bathwater! I am sure many people could find reason to complain about getting a bath in the hospital. But Dad never complained. You see I believe that while in the hospital he was thinking about those days growing up taking baths at the farm. While it was only once a week, he enjoyed that tradition. There is a saying about the glass being half full or half empty Dads glass was always full! Dad went to a country school and then on to Rothsay high school. He would tell me that he was so smart in grade school that he skipped 3rd grade. The truth be told, he would have been the only 3rd grader at the country school so he jumped in with the 4th graders. But being the true optimist, he used to his advantage. In high school he played sports and was a pretty good athlete, yesterday my brother Brian told me that Dad scored the first touchdown in Rothsay football history. That might be true, but it might be folklore as well. Dad LOVED being from Rothsay;.and he was not afraid to tell you so 2. Another thing you may not know is that Dad was 100% Norwegian He believed that Lutefisk and Lefse was the chosen food. He loved the Lutefisk dinner every year, right here in this church that he was involved with and he would tell me how much he loved serving those old Norwegians and watch as that melted butter drool down their cheeks. When I was a kid, we would come here, get you numbered ticket, wait in the pews for 1-2 hours just to enjoy that lovely food called lutefisk. Dad would tell in the old days they would serve 1400-1500 people. In the last few years I would ask Dad how the lutefisk dinner went at the church and he would say the attendance was down to about half of what is was in the ole days. Then he would chuckle and say I guess the market is not that big to get new recruits to eat lutefisk. Gosh, I wonder why? Dad was also known for his ability to share a few good Ole and Lena jokes as well. Upon perfect delivery of the punch line, he would laugh with the best of them. But yet he was still open minded enough to marry a half Swede and spent the next 50 plus years trying to convince Mom that her better half was the Norwegian blood. While Dad was a good carpet salesmen, this sales job was a little more difficult. 3. Dad was a God fearing Lutheran. Dad would be happy I got that one in Mom. While Dad was a faithful attendee of this church and did many things to support the needs of this church. Faith was important to Dad. On the lighter side, he would often tell me on a summer Sunday, that he believed that it was better to be on the golf course thinking about God vs. being in church thinking about the golf course . While he may have believed that, I can certainly tell you that did not go over quite as well with Mom. He would also chuckle and tell me that he believed that since there was only one God that there should only be one religion, that would be Lutheran. I am sure there are a few people in town that would beg to differ. Dad liked that! 4. Lived in Barnesville for 60 years Some people can become isolated in a small town, not Dad or Mom. They embraced living in a small town. And this showed in all the activities he was involved with for the well-being of Barnesville. The list is long. As a staunch supporter of Barnesville, this was demonstrated every Thanksgiving when we would go to cousin Patty's. You see, Patty's family lives in Breckenridge and depending who had won the football game that year had bragging rights. You can only imagine the anticipation upon Uncle Bobby's arrival. Heckling rights were on the line and Patty's kids were ready if Breckenridge had won they would have the Cowboy theme song blasting when Bobby arrived, but if Barnesville beat Breckenridge, well lets just say it would be a long day of Uncle Bobby's teasing. Dad was very proud to live in Barnesville and be an Ambassador on their behalf. 5. On occasion, Dad would have comments and views on his community and politics Mom would say that there were only 4 channels on the TV - the news at 5:30, 6 and 10 o'clock , ESPN, the Golf Channel and Fox Newsm that pretty much sums it up! Dad used these 5 pillars (Born in Rothsay, 100% Norwegian, God fearing Lutheran, Living in Barnesville and on occasion his comments and views on the community and politics to launch what I call the Chuck experience You know the drill. You are on main street, or in the Eagle Cafe, at church, on the golf course or in the Pool Hall. You see Dad coming your way and then you see his smile, his dimples and the twinkle in his eyes. He sees you and you know something is coming your way. Let the fun begin Dad is thinking. What is he going to say this time? What is he going to tease me about this time? How can I get out of this? Dad always enjoyed the ability to create a lively conversation at every opportunity for sure. Dad loved to laugh and he brought that out in people. He used to tell me that the good thing about a smile is that everyone has one . Laughter is good for you and it is free - he especially liked that free part! As my brother Dave said yesterday, Dad would only joke, tease or heckle with you if he liked you. This is so true. Dad liked a lot of people - many of them are here right now. I am sure everyone has memories of the Chuck experience . * From a personal perspective Dad provided me in 1999 with his bucket list of what he would like to do while we were having a discussion. He said, there are 3 things that I would like to do before I go into Norwegian Heaven: OK - shoot I said. 1. Play golf at St. Andrews I had the opportunity in 2000 to attend a business recognition trip in Scotland. One of the venues was to play the Old Course at St. Andrews. I worked extra hard to win that trip so I could take my Dad to St. Andrews and fulfill one of his wishes. On the first tee we met our caddies, and at the Old Course the caddies are just about as old and nearly as the golf course. They have caddied for the finest golfers and for some of the most famous celebrities in the world. They have seen it all. They know the game and can easily size up their golfers. Then they meet Dad. The first hole is straight, with the town of old St. Andrews way over to the left. Dad asked for the driver. He lined up and the caddy immediately noticed that Dad was aiming way too far to the left. Stop says the caddy. You need to aim more to the right . Dad says don't worry partner this is not my first rodeo .. Dad swings and the ball starts right at the ole town, goes up in the air, take a hard right, goes over 18 fairway, which is to the left of hole number 1, gently lands and rests square in the middle of the fairway. You should have seen the look on the caddy's face - Priceless. Since it was a par 4, the second shot was fast approaching and the caddy says Chuck, what iron would you like? Nope, Dad says, Give me the driver . Dad swings and the ball lands short of the green and rolls on the green. Caddy to Dad, Wow Chuck, I have never seen that one before . By the fourth hole Dad effectively had the caddy just shaking his head and obviously confused thinking if Dad would ever use anything else but a driver and putter. As the golf round continued I found myself enjoying the new found friendship that was being made in front of me. The round consisted of Dad hitting his driver, driver, putter, and par and the caddy shouting out that a boy Chuck! You see, Dad was very fortunate to have traveled to many places within and outside of the country. His ability to make that fast connection with everyone was simply amazing. Dad made a strong connection with all types of people young and old, boys and girls, women and men. Our foreign exchange student Chalo says it best: I would like to say one of the anecdotes I remember most from Dad. This is when Dad visited us in Bolivia. After having lunch and as usual in Bolivia my family started the party and of course the typical Bolivian dances. Everybody was dancing including Mom and Dad. Mom did not have any rhythm at all. While Dad was perfect it only took a couple of minutes to figure it out and then he was dancing like any Bolivian. My family and I were just amazed!! Dad was just like that!! Dad had that special rhythm and special beat to connect with all he cut a wide and deep path. I say to myself, bucket list number one - CHECK 2. Go to a Final Four Basketball Tournament Well in 2000 the Final Four was in Minneapolis at the Metrodome. I had share the request of my Dad with my two close friends that ran the Metrodome. I always had access to the best tickets for any event there. Since they had met my Dad from events previously, they simple said, Gary, we have you covered! Great, I thought. I am now about to get another bucket list wish checked off. They told me that these would be some of the finest tickets available as the Metrodome had two tickets for VIP purposes. They showed me where these tickets were and they simple were the absolute best tickets available. I was so excited to have Dad in these seats. But, since I am his son, I saw an opportunity to get back at Dad. Dad and his first cousin (Uncle Jack) were excited to attend this event as Uncle Jack's team Michigan State was playing. My friend Zippy and I began our plan. Let's tell them that tickets are extremely tough to get, so I said to Dad. Dad, Zippy feels very, very bad as your tickets are in the nosebleed section at the Metrodome way up in the upper deck . Dad said oh, no problem as we are just glad to be here . We attended the pre-game event and quickly handed Dad and Uncle Jack their tickets and we dashed off in anticipation of watching them going to their seats. We spot them, they are in the lower level, walking closer to their seats, questioning ushers, and staring in amazement. One row lower,Dad slaps Uncle Jack in the arm, One row lower, Dad and Uncle Jack are slapping and smiling. Ushers show them their seats and now Dad and Uncle Jack are sitting in the 12th row with Dad's left knee on the center court line. By now people are trying to figure out who these two VIPs are that are sitting right behind Dick Vitale, ESPN's face of college basketball . Sitting right next to the head coach of the hosting University of Minnesota I can see people saying who are those two sitting next to Vitale and Coach Monson; they must be important people. On that day and at that moment, Dad and Uncle Jack were important. They were VIPs. They just happen to be two VIPs from Rothsay, Minnesota! In between the two games that day, I could see Dad and Uncle Jack talking with Vitale, I began to chuckle as I can only imagine what Dad was saying to Vitale: Do you know where Rothsay is: Have you ever seen a Prairie Chicken? Do you have any Norwegian blood? Bucket list number two..CHECK! What could possibly be his last bucket list item? Place 2004 Master's golf hat on. 3. Attend the Master's Golf tournament. So I am now ready to tackle the last item. I pause as I think I know what he is going to say. He loved the Masters Golf Tournament and Augusta National. I say to myself, Please don't tell me you want to PLAY Augusta National, the course where they play the Master's every year. My gosh, the President of the U.S. can't even get on that course. Out comes his request. well you know how much I love watching the Masters. I cringe as this is truly one of the toughest requests around. Nope, Dad says, I would only like to attend the Masters tournament. Now, this is still a very tough request indeed. Well, in 2004 I had the opportunity to have two tickets to the Masters. The problem that year was it fell on Easter Sunday. Now, in our family that meant Easter at Mom and Dads house. But this is Dad's third bucket list item and I had tickets in hand for that Saturday the day before Easter. I have flights and tickets in hand and ready to go to the Masters. This certainly won't be a problem for Dad to miss only one year of Easter in Barnesville for the Masters. I talk to the Boss and a kitchen pass is approved and I am ready to tell him we are going to the Masters. I am so excited to share this with Dad and upon announcement he himmed and hahhed and deliberated. For him, this would mean cutting into the planning and helping to get ready for Easter at home. Sorry Gary, but I gotta pass on this one. You see with Dad, that meant Family was coming. And with Family coming, nothing would get in the way, even going to the Masters Tournament. He had a great Easter in Barnesville that year and we agreed to get there sometime soon. So, I wear this Masters hat in honor of our Master who will be wearing this in his new home, Norwegian Heaven. There is one thing for sure, he appreciated every, every minute of his life. 79 plus years. This is not to say that every minute was laughter and smiling as he had tough times along the way. But I can say with absolute certainty is that there were many, many, many better times than difficult times. Dad left huge shoes to fill. He was a fantastic community leader, a wonderful friend and simply a great Father and Husband. Dad lived with dignity and honor. He was a great Man, and if I can be only half the Man that he was, .well, I would feel that I have accomplished much. Dad knows that we will be just fine here, we will be just fine. This is our time to say thank you to Dad from his Community, his Friends and his Family. Thanks Dad for all you have done for us. Also for the twinkle in his eyes and the smile that you wore. Thanks for taking our tears and turning them into laughter. Smile on!. Chuck Charlie Bobbie Grandpa Dad Husband Smile on! We miss you already and we all love you very much! Uff Da! Walk off and place the 2004 Masters golf hat on the head of Dad's casket.
To order memorial trees or send flowers to the family in memory of Charles "Chuck" Martinson, please visit our flower store.

Visits: 5

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the
Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

Service map data © OpenStreetMap contributors

Send Flowers

Send Flowers

Plant A Tree

Plant A Tree